NATIONAL SERVICE SCHEME


About NSS:

Popularly known as NSS, the scheme was launched in Gandhiji's Centenary year, 1969. Aimed at developing student's personality through community service. NSS, is a voluntary association of young people in Colleges, Universities and at +2 level working for a campus-community linkage.
The cardinal principle of the NSS programme is that it is organised by the students themselves, and both students and teachers through their combined participation in community service, get a sense of involvement in the tasks of nation building.


The National Service Scheme (NSS) is an

Indian government - sponsored public service program conducted by the Department of Youth Affairs and Sports of the Government of India. Popularly known as NSS, the scheme was launched in Gandhiji's Centenary year, 1969. Aimed at developing student's personality through community service, NSS is a voluntary association of young people in Colleges, Universities and at +2 level working for a campus-community linkage. The cardinal principle of the NSS programme is that it is organised by the students themselves, and both students and teachers through their combined participation in community service, get a sense of involvement in the tasks of nation building.


Objectives behind the NSS:

  • To enable the students to understand the community in which they work.
  • To understand themselves in relation to their community.
  • To identify the needs and problems in the community in the solution of which they can be involved.
  • To develop among themselves a sense of social and civic responsibility.
  • To apply education- find practical solution to individual & community problems.
  • To develop competence required for group living and sharing responsibilities.
  • Gain skills in mobilising community participation.
  • To acquire leadership qualities and democratic attitude.
  • To develop capacity to meet emergencies and national disasters
  • To practice national integration.

NSS Charter:

The NSS at Kits provides each student with a significant context in which He/She can arrive at a deeper understanding of social reality in India today. The NSS encourages the meaning of the life through service.


NSS Motto:

The motto or watchword of the National Service Scheme is 'NOT ME BUT YOU'. This reflects the essence of democratic living and upholds the need for selfless service and appreciation of the other person's point of view and also to show consideration for fellow human beings. It underlines that the welfare of an individual is ultimately dependent on the welfare of society on the whole. Therefore, it should be the aim of the NSS to demonstrate this motto in its day-to-day programme.

NSS Day:

NSS was formally launched on 24th September, 1969, the birth centenary year of the Father of the Nation. Therefore, 24 September is celebrated every year as NSS Day with appropriate programmes and activities.

National Service Committee was launched in the year 1959-60 under the chairmanship of Dr. C. D. Deshmukh, had recommended that National Service for a period of 9 months to a year should be made compulsory before a student enters the university or employment. The Saiyidain committee (1961) Appointed by the ministry of education did not favour compulsion and recommended National or Social Service for a minimum period of 12 weeks on a voluntary basis.

The National Service Scheme was launched in 1969. It aims at the involvement mainly of undergraduate students on a voluntary basis in various activities of social serviced and national development which while making a contribution to socio-economic progress would also provide opportunities to the students to understand and appreciate the problems of the communities, awaken social consciousness and inculcate in them sense of dignity of labour. There has been a great deal of enthusiasm among the students in various programmers taken up under the scheme. At the same time, there has been a demand from several quarters that opportunity should be provided to the youth going out of the universities and colleges to engage themselves on a whole time basis for a specific period in activities of social and national service. Some attempts in this direction have been made in some states during last few years.

The post-independence era was marked by an urge for introducing social service for students, both as a measure of educational reform and as a means to improve the quality of educated man-power. The University Grants Commission headed by Dr.Radhakrishnan recommended introduction of national service in the academic institutions on a voluntary basis with a view to developing healthy contacts between the students and teachers on the one hand and establishing a constructive linkage between the campus and the community on the other hand.

The idea was again considered by the Central Advisory Board of Education (CABE) at its meeting held in January, 1950. After examining the various aspects of the matter and in the light of experience of other countries in this field, the Board recommended that students should devote some time to manual work on a voluntary basis and that the teachers should also associate with them in such work. In the draft First Five Year Plan adopted by the Government of India in 1952, the need for social and labour service for students for one year was further stressed. Consequent upon this, layout and social service camps, campus-work projects, village apprenticeship scheme etc., were put into operation by various educational institutions. In 1958, the then Prime Minister Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru in his letter to the Chief Ministers, mooted the idea of having social service as a prerequisite for graduation. He further directed the Ministry of Education to formulate a suitable scheme for introduction of national service into the academic institutions.

In 1959, a draft outline of the scheme was placed before the Education Minister's Conference. The Conference was unanimous about the urgent need for trying out a workable scheme for national service. In view of the fact that education as it was imparted in schools and colleges, left something to be desired and it was necessary to supplement it with programmes which would arouse interest in the social and economic reconstruction of the country. It was viewed that if the objectives of the scheme were to be realised, it was essential to integrate social service with the educational process as early as possible. The Conference suggested the appointment of a committee to work out details of the proposed pilot project. In pursuance of these recommendations, a National Service Committee was appointed under the Chairmanship of Dr.C.D.Deshmukh on August 28, 1959 to make concrete suggestions in this direction. The committee recommended that national service for a period of nine months to a year may be made compulsory for all students completing high school education and intending to enroll themselves in a college or a university. The scheme was to include some military training, social service, manual labour and general education. The recommendations of the Committee could not be accepted because of its financial implications and difficulties in implementation.

In 1960, at the instance of the Government of India, Prof.K.G.Saiyidain studied national service by students implemented in several countries of the world and submitted his report under the title " National Service for the Youth " to the Government with a number of recommendations as to what could be done in India to develop a feasible scheme of social service by students. It was recommended that national or social service should be introduced on a voluntary basis and extended as widely as possible with a provision for rich and varied programmes of activities. It was also recommended that social service camps should be open to students as well as non-students within the prescribed age group for better interrelationship.

The Education Commission headed by Dr.D.S.Kothari (1964-66) recommended that students at all stages of education should be associated with some form of social service. This was taken into account by the State Education Ministers during their conference in April 1969 and they recommended that at the university stage, students could be permitted to join the National Cadet Corps (NCC) which was already in existence on a a voluntary basis and an alternative to this could be offered to them in the form of a new programme called the National Service Scheme (NSS). Promising sportsmen, however, should be exempted from both and allowed to join another scheme called the National Sports Organisation (NSO), in view of the need to give priority to the development of sports and athletics.

The details were soon worked out and the Planning Commission sanctioned an outlay of Rs.5 crores for National Service Scheme (NSS) during the Fourth Five Year Plan. It was stipulated that the NSS programme should be started as a pilot project in select institutions and universities.

On September 24, 1969, the then Union Education Minister Dr.V.K.R.V.Raio, launched the NSS programme in 37 universities covering all States and simultaneously requested the Chief Ministers of States for their cooperation and held. It was appropriate that the programme was started during the Gandhi Centenary Year as it was Gandhiji who inspired the Indian Youth to participate in the movement for Indian independence and the social uplift of the down-trodden masses of our nation. The programme is implemented effectively in the State of TamilNadu since its inception.


NATIONAL SERVICE SCHEME (N.S.S) UNIT

 

N.S.S Programme officer

                 A.SHRAVAN SAMPATHKUMAR

       Assoc .professor cum N.S.S Programme officer

      -Dept of MBA-

 

N.S.S ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERS

         1)  Dr. A M.MAHABOOB BASHA

                             Principal

                          -Dept of MBA-

 

           2)  SHAIK RIYAZ BASHA

                        Associate. Professor

                           -Dept of MBA-

N.S.S Volunteers

The following students have been appointed as National Service Scheme (N.S.S) Volunteers


to look over the Regular activities and special activities in N.S.S CELL.
NAME OF THE STUDENTS

1) ANIMELA MASTANAIAH

2) ARAVETI NARASIMHA REDDY

3) ATLOOR RAVIKUMAR

4) BANDANADAM PRAVEEN KUMAR

5) BANDI SREEJA

6) BARRE LOKESH REDDY

7) BINGI SIVA KRISHNA

8) BOLLEVULA LAKSHMI NARAYANAMMA

9) KANDAKURU RAMU

10) KAPIRI KARUNYA KUMAR

11) KARANAM GOWRISHANKAR

12) KATAM BHASKAR

13) KATARU NAGARANI

14) KODATHALA MEENA

15) MANNETI PRATHAP REDDY

16) MENTA NEELAM

17) MITTA CHENNAKRISHNAREDDY

18) MITTA PRADEEP REDDY

19) MITTAGIRI MAHABOOB BASHA

20) MOGHAL SABEER ALI BAIG

21) MOPURI SAI KUMAR REDDY

22) PITTU GANGADHAR

23) POREDDY ESWAR REDDY

24) POSA VENKATASATISH KUMAR

25) POTTA SOWMYA

26) PULLAGURA RAJASEKHAR

27) PUSALAPATI NARAYANA

28) PUTLUR BHARGAVI

29) PUTLURU RAGHUNATHA REDDY

30) SHAIK ABDUL REHAMAN

31) SHAIK ABDUL REHMAN

32) SHAIK ABUBAKAR SIDDIQ

33) SHAIK AMEENULLAH

34) SHAIK AMEER BASHA

35) SHAIK ASIF ALI

36) SHAIK KHALEEL BASHA

37) SHAIK MAHABOOB SHARIEF

38) SHAIK MAHAMMAD SHAFI

39) SHAIK MAHAMMED ABUZAR ASLAM

40) SHAIK MANSOORA

41) SHAIK MOHAMMAD SHARIEF

42) SHAIK MOHAMMED AFROZ

43) SHAIK MOHAMMED ALI

44) SHAIK MOHAMMED ASLAM BAKSH

45) SHAIK MOHAMMED TAHA

46) SHAIK MOULA HUSSAIN

47) SHAIK NAJMUNNISA

48) SHAIK SHABBEER

49) SHAIK SHAFIULLA

50) SOMAIAH HARI BABU

REGULAR ACTIVITIES


1) PLANITATION by Balaji College chairman LEVAKU LAKSHMI REDDY GARU-PHOTOS 13-02-2015




2) Free supply of paddy to poor village people by our vice-chairman-photo



NSS volunteers generally work with villages, slums and voluntary agencies to complete 120 hours of regular activities during an academic year. As per the fundamental principles of National Service Scheme, a volunteer is expected to remain in constant touch with the community. Hence, it is of vital importance that a particular village/slum is selected for implementation of NSS programmes. As the NSS volunte4er is to live with the members of the community and learn from their experience during his/her tenure in NSS, the village/slum should be carefully selected for adoption by NSS unit.



1. Adoption of Villages


1.1 Adoption of a village and area is a very meaningful programme in NSS. It is far better to concentrate attention on one village and take up the task for development perspective, than to fritter away energy in many locations involving too many activities which may not be completed at all or where the follow up action may not be possible. From this point of view, village adoption programme should ensure continuity of work vis-a-vis sustained action, evaluation and follow up work.



Contacting Village/Area Leaders


1.2 As a first step in this programme, it is necessary to establish contact with more than one village which would help to select a village where 'Leadership' is well established. In other words, selecting a village with proper leadership is very important as the sustained follow up action and evaluation is ensured in such places. To start with, the NSS unit can take the help of the Block Authorities, District Panchayat Officer, District Tribal Welfare Officer, District Medical Officer, Extension Officer of Agriculture, Irrigation and Education Departments for the selection of the village. It is to be noted that the selected villages should be within a short distance from the college so that constant contact can easily be made.


Survey of the Village/Area


1.3 1.3 Before drawing up the plan of action, it is absolutely necessary to conduct a comprehensive survey of few villages situated at a short distance from the college. The assistance from the teachers and students of agriculture, economics, commerce, geography, statistics, home science, social work, medicine, psychology and education etc. have to be sought for the purpose. Conducting socio-economic survey can be an interesting field activity which has direct bearing on the curriculum of economics, commerce, statistics, psychology, health education etc. The report of such a survey will provide up-to-date information about the problems and potentials of the village and help in programme planning for village development. The applied field work will help the students to increase their analytical ability and deepen their thinking. Further, this will help them to identify the problems which have been left unnoticed. The survey work can also be accomplished with the help of PRA exercises (Participatory Rural Appraisal).


Identification of Problem(s)


1.4 It is on the basis of this need assessment that projects/programmes are to be formulated. The programme officers should use their discretion and should identify the projects which can be completed by seeking assistance from the communities/other agencies.

1.5 As the aim of adoption of village or area is to give new ideas of development to the villagers which would improve their living conditions. Once the trust of the communities is won, they start cooperating with the NSS volunteers and approach them for solution of their problems. One of the important services that can be rendered by NSS volunteers is disseminating information about the latest developments in agriculture, watershed management, wastelands development, non-conventional energy, low cost housing, sanitation, nutrition and personal hygiene, schemes for skill development, income generation, government schemes, legal aid, consumer protection and allied field. A liaison between government and other development agencies like Banks, IRDP, ICDS, NREP, DWCRA, JRY etc. can also be made.

1.6 The Programme Officers (PO) should motivate the communities to involve themselves with NSS for the community development work undertaken by the NSS unit. Further he or she will have to seek the help of various government departments and agencies for technical advice and financial assistance. Therefore, he/she must establish lathes good rapport with the government officials and development agencies. For this, it is better if the administration is taken into confidence by prior consultations.


Completion of Projects

1.7 As already stated, the Programme Officer must select the projects very carefully as the image of NSS depends upon the successful completion of such projects. Successful completion of the projects can win appreciation and credit of the community'


Evaluation of Project

1.8 Every project should be evaluated after its completion by involving members of the community, Government officials and Panchayat officials. The NSS unit should learn from the lapses in the execution of the project and plan for the next project keeping in view the bottlenecks and constraints faced by them during the earlier project.


2. Adoption of Slums

Most of the colleges and universities are usually located in the urban areas. Due to long distance between the college campuses and the villages, the visits to the adopted villages by the NSS volunteers may become expensive and time consuming. In view of this, it is desirable to adopt slum especially by colleges located in urban areas.

Survey of the Slum


2.1 F 2.1 adoption of a slum, there should be composite survey team consisting of students drawn from faculties like, Arts, Science, Engineering, Medicine, Home Science and Social Work etc. The selected areas should be compact and should be easily accessible for students. Areas with acute political conflicts may be avoided.
2.2 The issues pertaining to the identification of problems, project planning, interaction and coordination with the various departmental agencies, execution and completion of projects shall be undertaken on the same basis/lines as discussed earlier in the part 'Adoption of Villages'. The progress of projects should also be reviewed frequently.


NSS volunteers for Slum Work


2.3 Taking into account the living conditions & status of slum dwellers of the slums, only highly motivated, adaptable, mature and skilled students should, be selected for slum development.
2.4 Following are the tasks which the students can undertake in slum areas:-


Special Camping Programme

Special Camping forms an integral part of National Service Scheme. It has special appeal to the youth as it provides unique opportunities to the students for group living, collective experience sharing and constant interaction with community.

1. Special campings are organised generally on various developmental issues of national importance. In the past the themes of the Special Camping Programmes have been 'Youth Against Famine', 'Youth Against Dirt and Disease', 'Youth for Rural Reconstruction', 'Youth for Eco-Development' and 'Youth for Mass Literacy', 'Youth for National Integration & Social Harmony'. The current theme of Special Camp is 'Youth for Sustainable Development with special focus on Watershed Management and Wasteland Development. Every year 50 percent of the volunteers of each NSS unit are expected to participate in special camps which is of ten days duration.


Contributions of Special Camping Programme

1.1 Concerted efforts have to be made for a number of years for reconstruction activities in rural areas and urban slums for improving the living conditions of economically and socially weaker sections of the community. For this, the universities colleges land +2 institutions having NSS have a special role to play in collaboration with other Departments and local authorities engaged in Development work. They should adopt a village or group of villages/urban slums for intensive social development, where special camps are organised by them year after year to create tangible and durable community assets.

voter awareness campaigns -1









Rangoli Competition-







Objectives of the Special Camping programme :






1.2 The primary objectives of the special camping programmes are:-


(i) Making education more relevant to the present situation to meet the felt needs of the communities and supplement the education of university/college/school students by bringing them face to face with the community situation.

(ii) To provide opportunities to students to play their due roles in the implementation of various development "programmes by planning and executing development projects, which not only help in creating durable community assets in rural areas and slums but also result in improvement of the condition of weaker sections of the communities.

(iii) Encouraging the students and non-students youth to work along with the adults in rural areas, thereby developing their character, social consciousness and commitment, discipline ad healthy and helpful attitudes towards the community:

(iv) Building up potential youth leaders by exploring the latent potential among the campers, both students as well as local youth (rural and urban), with a view to involve them more intimately in development projects for longer periods. The local leadership generated during the camps would also be useful in ensuring proper maintenance of the assets created as a result of the camps.

(v) Emphasizing the dignity of labour and self-help and the need for combining physical work with intellectual pursuits, and

(vi) Encouraging youth to participate enthusiastically in the process of national development, and promote national integration through democratic living and cooperative action.